The Charlotte Chamber on Monday issued a statement on North Carolina’s new law limiting LGBT protections that called on city and state leaders “to contribute toward a solution that is in the best interest of our city and state.” Here Gov. Pat McCrory clenches his fist as he makes an economic development announcement last month at the chamber. Diedra Laird dlaird@charlotteobserver.com
The Charlotte Chamber on Monday issued a statement on North Carolina’s new law limiting LGBT protections that called on city and state leaders “to contribute toward a solution that is in the best interest of our city and state.” Here Gov. Pat McCrory clenches his fist as he makes an economic development announcement last month at the chamber. Diedra Laird dlaird@charlotteobserver.com

Business

Charlotte Chamber urges state, city leaders to find solution on LGBT law

April 04, 2016 01:30 PM

UPDATED April 04, 2016 03:07 PM

The Charlotte Chamber on Monday issued a statement on North Carolina’s new law limiting LGBT protections that called on city and state leaders “to contribute toward a solution that is in the best interest of our city and state.”

The business organization’s executive committee said the Chamber “opposes discrimination in all forms,” but did not call for any specific actions.

The statement comes almost two weeks after Gov. Pat McCrory signed controversial House Bill 2 into law. The chamber’s executive committee, led by chairman Ned Curran of the Bissell real estate company, met to discuss the issue Friday and sent it to the governor, the Mecklenburg County Legislative Delegation and the Charlotte City Council later that day, Chamber spokeswoman Natalie Dick said.

The new North Carolina LGBT bill was a response to a provision in Charlotte’s expanded nondiscrimination ordinance that would have allowed transgender people to use the bathroom that corresponds to the gender with which they identify. Other major corporations like American Airlines and Apple, as well as sports organizations like the NBA, have already voiced their disapproval.

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The statement said the passage of the city ordinance and its subsequent repeal by the legislature have put the “positive perception of Charlotte and North Carolina” at risk.

“The Charlotte Chamber supports our well-deserved reputation as a city that promotes and embraces diversity, inclusion and equality,” the statement continues. “The business community, in particular, understands the need to develop, attract and retain diverse talent. We believe that the growing diversity of our population is, in fact, a competitive advantage for Charlotte’s economy. The Charlotte Chamber of Commerce opposes discrimination in all forms.”

The North Carolina Chamber has said it is “conducting an analysis” of the measure.

“We look forward to leading our state to new opportunities for North Carolina’s current residents and those who want to join us in the future,” the N.C. Chamber said.