Campaigning on election day

Still hunting for votes Vi Lyles and Joel Ford were out amongst the people working for votes in hopes of defeating Mayor Jennifer Roberts by winning the Democrat primary election for mayor.
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Still hunting for votes Vi Lyles and Joel Ford were out amongst the people working for votes in hopes of defeating Mayor Jennifer Roberts by winning the Democrat primary election for mayor.
By

Politics & Government

Polls open today in mayoral, council primaries. Here's what you need to know.

September 11, 2017 11:07 AM

Charlotte voters can expect a wet and windy day as go to the polls Tuesday to nominate candidates for mayor and city council.

The primaries will essentially choose council members from three districts where there’s no general election. And they’ll nominate candidates in other districts where one party dominates.

More than 12,000 voters cast ballots in early voting. That’s about 2.3 percent of eligible voters in what’s expected to be a low-turnout primary. That means your vote counts more.

Here are some things to keep in mind:

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When can I vote?

Polls open at 6:30 a.m. and close at 7:30 p.m.

Who can vote?

Democrats and unaffiliated voters can vote in the Democratic primaries. Republicans and unaffiliated voters can take part in the GOP primaries.

Who can I vote for?

Democrats can vote for mayor, at-large council candidates and candidates in most council districts.

Republicans have a choice for mayor and in District 6 in southeast Charlotte.

To check out your personal sample ballot, visit https://vt.ncsbe.gov/RegLkup/.

Will there be a runoff?

Runoffs are possible in several council races as well as the Democratic mayoral primary.

In that race, Mayor Jennifer Roberts faces Mayor Pro Tem Vi Lyles, state Sen. Joel Ford as well as Constance Partee Johnson and Lucille Puckett. A candidate needs 40 percent of the vote to win outright. If no one reaches that, the second-place finisher has the right to call for a second primary.

When can I see the results?

Results should start coming in a half-hour or so after the polls close. Check here for the results as they come.

Jim Morrill: 704-358-5059, @jimmorrill